COURSES
Clink on links below for complete course descriptions.

Religion
Reading
Spelling
Vocabulary
Composition
Penmanship
Memory Training
Grammar
Latin
Arithmetic Theory
Arithmetic Comp
Science
Ancient History
Washington State History
Art and Music
Health
Physical Education
Religion
Reading
Spelling
Vocabulary
Composition
Penmanship
Grammar
Latin
Arithmetic Theory
Arithmetic Comp
Science
History of the Roman Empire
Geography
Art and Music
Health Physical Education
Religion
Reading
Spelling
Vocabulary
Composition
Independent Reading
Grammar
Latin
Arithmetic Theory
Arithmetic Comp
Science
History of the
Eastern Roman Empire
Geography
Art and Music
Gregorian Chant
Health
Physical Education
Religion
Reading
Spelling
Vocabulary
Composition
Independent Reading
Grammar
Latin
Arithmetic Theory
Arithmetic Comp
Science
Medieval History
Pacific Northwest
History
Art and Music
Gregorian Chant
Health
Physical Education

CURRICULUM FOR 3rd GRADE

RELIGION This course is broken up into two parts. One semester is spent on the Sacraments, the other on the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. This course is given orally with lectures, talks and discussions. The teacher presents the material, and the students are free to ask any questions they may have. The teacher may use a variety of methods to present the material and test the students to make sure they understand it.

READING This course uses McGuffey's Third Eclectic Reader . The children are taught to analyze the stories and to produce a synopsis (or precis) of each according to the type of selection it is. Students do oral reading to maintain their proficiency in phonics and to learn to read with the proper inflections that aid in understanding what is being read. The purpose of the course is to develop good habits of reading for understanding.

SPELLING This course uses lists from the Webster's Old Blueback Speller . This venerable book is so designed that it fits very well with the phonics-and-spelling-rules approach we use to teach spelling. This book is augmented with lists of words exemplifying certain rules being taught and with other grade appropriate lists.

GRAMMAR This course uses Voyages in English 3 published by Loyola University Press. The students learn the basic facts of nouns, verb tenses, homonyms, synonyms, and antonyms. They also learn about the basic types of sentences, capitalization, and punctuation.

PENMANSHIP In this course, the students continue to practice their handwriting and learn to make their letters smaller. They also learn to make their papers neat and beautiful. We use our own text, which teaches the students a method of handwriting similar to the Palmer Method.

VOCABULARY Students are given weekly vocabulary words from their reading story. They are to learn the words and their definitions. They also write sentences using these words. This helps the students grasp the meanings of the words. The student is required to come up with the sentences on his own. Later, the teacher works with the student and explains how the sentences can be improved. The student then 'fixes up' his sentences and hands them in for a grade. The final grade on the sentences does take into consideration the quality of the original work done by the student.

COMPOSITION Composition is introduced through having the students write paragraphs on the materials studied in Washington State History. The students are taught to construct expository or narrative paragraphs about places and people they study. They are also introduced to the methods of bridging paragraphs and do some work in multiple paragraph compositions. The work done with multiple paragraph compositions is limited in third grade. Fourth grade students and higher, however, do extensive work in this area.

MEMORY TRAINING This course is special. We believe it is good for the students to memorize things. After all, everything we remember is essentially 'memorized'. By deliberately trying to memorize things, the students can train their own memories and thus make them more useful tools for learning in general. Besides, the things chosen for the students to memorize are chosen with a view of broadening their experience in other subjects: poetry, short speeches, religion items, and such -and, of course, their basic arithmetic facts.

LATIN This is the first grade level that uses a book for Latin. This year is basically concerned with the development of the student's vocabulary. One way this is accomplished is through the use of pictures and corresponding Latin sentences. It is also done through short stories, each story having a corresponding picture. As the book advances, students are asked questions, in Latin, about the short stories they have read. The questions are to be answered in Latin. The students also get a chance at translating some simple English sentences into Latin.

ARITHMETIC THEORY This course uses the third grade level of Seeing through Arithmetic by Scott Foresman. Students are introduced to the concepts of sets, subsets, the intersection and union of sets, and basic geometry. The students also work with money math and continue to learn how to do basic types of word problems.

ARITHMETIC COMPUTATION By the time they get to third grade they must know how to do addition and subtraction. Hopefully, they have moved on to at least multiplication. The students in third grade do spend some time reviewing these basic operations. Students at this level are to master single and double-digit multiplication. Division is also introduced at this grade level. The students who 'catch on' to these concepts are allowed to go as far as they can, even if that means advancing past division and into fractions.

SCIENCE Science is understood by us to be a two-fold thing. It is both "What scientists do" and a level of human knowledge. Science is introduced in third grade as a level of human knowledge. The students are brought to realize that what is known scientifically is known in a different way from what is known by acquaintance. They are made to put their minds to use in some simple scientific operations, and then they are taken through an analysis of that they did with their minds in that process. The third grade science class doesn't do any of the things that scientists do. The text for this class is our own, developed for the specific task it has to do. Specifically, it deals with sets, subsets, classifying objects as members of a set, defining objects in terms of sets, an introduction to Plato's Method of Division, whole objects, their parts, design, and types of change.

HISTORY History classes through sixth grade use our own texts. Third grade students study ancient history. They begin with Adam and Eve and follow the development of that line up through the Chosen People to the time they were conquered by the Romans. Then they go back in time to pick up some of the other important civilizations. These civilizations include Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Greece.

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY The students learn about their state: its shape and main features, its cities and points of interest. They also learn the history of several of these places.

ART AND MUSIC The children at this level review color theory and learn how to achieve and use balance in their pictures. They also learn how to obtain light and shadow in order to give their pictures realism. They also do some study of the art of the civilization they are studying in history. Finally, the students continue to improve their ability to do sight reading while they are singing.

HEALTH This is the first year in a two-year introduction to health. The topics include basic information about the body, the basic functions of different body parts and how to take care of these body parts. This is kept on a simple scale and does not include any information concerning reproduction. This matter is left to the parents.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION We use the course in physical education to teach sportsmanship and genteel social behavior. We use the games played as opportunities to plant in the children a certain competitive drive while trying to balance it with good attitudes about winning and losing. We also teach the students the need to play fair and to follow the rules of the game. The games played also help develop the children's bodies and coordination.

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CURRICULUM FOR 4th GRADE

RELIGION This year's religion studies the catechism. The book generally used in this course is the Saint Joseph Baltimore Catechism Number 1 . The students read the lessons and do the exercises at the end of each lesson. They also memorize selected question/answer combinations.

READING This course uses McGuffey's Fourth Eclectic Reader . The children are taught to analyze the stories and to produce a synopsis (or precis) of each according to the type of selection it is. Students do oral reading to maintain their proficiency in phonics and to learn to read with the proper inflections that aid in understanding what is being read. The purpose of the course is to develop good habits of reading for understanding.

SPELLING This course uses lists from the Webster's Old Blueback Speller . This venerable book is so designed that it fits very well with the phonics-and-spelling-rules approach we use to teach spelling. This book is augmented with lists of words exemplifying certain rules being taught and with other grade appropriate lists.

GRAMMAR This course uses Voyages in English 4 published by Loyola University Press. This course reinforces the material the students learned in third grade about nouns, verb tenses, homonyms, synonyms, antonyms, the basic types of sentences, punctuation and capitalization. It also helps prepare them for fifth grade grammar, which begins the students' serious study of the parts of speech.

PENMANSHIP This course varies with the individual student. If the student needs more work on his penmanship skills, the student will have lessons dealing with that fact. If the student has satisfactorily proven his ability to write, he may not have to do any writing drills. Students in this category will be graded on the quality of their penmanship on various other assignments. These assignments may include, but are not limited to, grammar exercises and compositions.

VOCABULARY Students are given weekly vocabulary words from their reading story. They are to learn the words and their definitions. They also may write sentences using these words. This helps the students grasp the meanings of the words. The student is required to come up with the sentences on his own. Later, the teacher works with the student and explains how the sentences can be improved. The student then 'fixes up' his sentences and hands them in for a grade. The final grade on the sentences does take into consideration the quality of the original work done by the student.

COMPOSITION This course is introduced through having the students write 3 and 5 paragraph compositions on the materials studied in Geography. Using this material, the students are taught to construct expository / narrative and argumentative compositions about places and people they study. They also practice the methods of bridging paragraphs and making the multiple paragraphs into a cohesive whole.

HISTORY We use our own principal text along with selected readings from Rome and the Romans and Young Folks Plutarch . Fourth grade students study the Roman Empire from its beginning to the fall of the West.

LATIN In this year's Latin the students read digests of their history in Latin. They learn new vocabulary with almost every lesson. They also answer questions in Latin, translate Latin sentences into English and translate English sentences into Latin.

ARITHMETIC THEORY In this course students continue to learn mathematical concepts. The concepts addressed in fourth grade include a review of sets, the identity elements, some mathematical properties (associative and commutative), geometry (planes, lines, segments, rays, angles, polygons, and circles), word problems, graphing of ordered pairs, and an introduction to rate pairs.

ARITHMETIC COMPUTATIONBy the time a student finished grade he should have a good grasp on how to do addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The basic concepts of fractions are introduced at this grade level. The students who 'catch on' to these concepts are allowed to get as far as they can, even if that means delving deeper into fractions.

SCIENCE Science is understood by us to be a two-fold thing. It is both "What scientists do" and a level of human knowledge. Science is introduced in third grade as a level of human knowledge. The students are brought to realize that what is known scientifically is known in a different way from what is known by acquaintance. They are made to put their minds to use in some simple scientific operations, and then they are taken through an analysis of that they did with their minds in that process. The fourth grade science book looks at the idea of what science is and develops into a study of biology.

GEOGRAPHY In fourth grade, the students study the geography of the Western Hemisphere. The students study Anglo-America and Latin America.

ART AND MUSIC The students have additional study on techniques and production of art along with some study of Roman and American art. They also spend some time practicing sight singing.

HEALTH This is the second year in a two-year introduction to health. The topics include basic information about the body, the basic functions of different body parts and how to take care of these body parts. This is kept on a simple scale and does not include any information concerning reproduction. This matter is left to the parents.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION We use the course in physical education to teach sportsmanship and genteel social behavior. We use the games played as opportunities to plant in the children a certain competitive drive while trying to balance it with good attitudes about winning and losing. We also teach the students the need to play fair and to follow the rules of the game. The games played also help develop the children's bodies and coordination.

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CURRICULUM FOR 5th GRADE

RELIGION This course is a more in depth study of the catechism. The book generally used in this course is the Saint Joseph Baltimore Catechism Number 2 . The students study each lesson then do the exercises at the end of each lesson.

READING This course uses half of McGuffey's Fifth Eclectic Reader . The other half is done in sixth grade. The children analyze the stories and produce a synopsis (or precis) of each according to the type of selection it is. The purpose of the course is to develop good habits of reading for understanding.

SPELLING This course uses lists from the Webster's Old Blueback Speller . This venerable book is so designed that it fits very well with the phonics-and-spelling-rules approach we use to teach spelling. This book is augmented with lists of words exemplifying certain rules being taught and with other grade appropriate lists.

GRAMMAR Fifth grade marks the beginning of a student's serious study of the parts of speech that will go through eighth grade. At the end of the year, the student will have studied nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, interjections, and phrases.

INDEPENDENT READING In this course each student is required to do some reading on his own. He is assigned to read for thirty minutes each school night. Upon completion of a book the student is to write a book report. Grades are given both for the reading done and the book report.

VOCABULARY Students are given weekly vocabulary words from their reading story. They are to learn the words and their definitions. They are given weekly quizzes to make sure they are learning the material.

COMPOSITION Students write three and five paragraph works on the materials studied in Geography and History. Using this material, the students are taught to construct expository/narrative and argumentative compositions about places and people they study. They also practice the methods of bridging paragraphs and improving their introductions and conclusions.

LATIN In fifth grade the students read stories about daily life. They learn new vocabulary with almost every lesson. They also answer questions in Latin, translate Latin sentences into English and translate English sentences into Latin. Students are also introduced at a basic level to the different endings of nouns and adjectives, as well as verb tenses. A more intense study of Latin grammar begins in sixth grade.

ARITHMETIC THEORY In this course students continue to learn mathematical concepts. The concepts addressed in fifth grade include the identity elements, some mathematical properties (associative and distributive), number theory, geometry (the concepts of similarity and congruence, a more in depth look at planes and various surfaces), word problems, solution sets (both finding and graphing), work with ordered pairs, rate pairs, and measurements (segment length, perimeter, area, and angle measure).

ARITHMETIC COMPUTATION This course first reviews addition, subtraction, multiplication and division with a view to increasing precision and speed. It then moves on with a thorough study of fractions and decimals.

SCIENCE Fifth grade science begins with a brief study of what science is, particularly in terms of systems rather than sets. It continues with an overview of different kinds of sciences. It then goes into a study of electronics as various systems.

HISTORY This year in history the students study the Eastern Roman Empire from the time of Constantine through its fall in 1453. The students learn to construct and use time charts as study tools for history.

GEOGRAPHY In this course the students (earn the geography of Europe, Africa, Australia, and Asia.

ART AND MUSIC In this course the students learn about the art and music of the era they are studying in history. That is, Byzantine art and music.

GREGORIAN CHANT The students learn the basic history of chant, the theory involved in interpreting it, and also how to sight-sing Gregorian Chant.

HEALTH In fifth grade, the students learn about the food groups, types of exercise, the skeleton, bones, joints, muscles and skin.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION We use the course in physical education to teach sportsmanship and genteel social behavior. We use the games played as opportunities to plant in the children a certain competitive drive while trying to balance it with good attitudes about winning and losing. We also teach the students the need to play fair and to follow the rules of the game. The games played also help develop the children's bodies and coordination.

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CURRICULUM FOR 6th GRADE

RELIGION Six grade students spend the first semester studying Bible History. They spend the second semester studying Church History.

READING This course uses the half of McGuffey's Fifth Eclectic Reader not done in fifth grade. The children analyze the stories and produce a synopsis (or precis) of each according to the type of selection it is. The purpose of the course is to develop good habits of reading for understanding.

SPELLING This course uses lists from the Webster's Old Blueback Speller. This venerable book is so designed that it fits very well with the phonics-and-spelting-rules approach we use to teach spelling. This book is augmented with lists of words exemplifying certain rules being taught and with other grade appropriate lists.

GRAMMAR Sixth grade marks the second year of a student's serious study of the parts of speech that will go through eighth grade. At the end of the year, the student will have studied, in greater detail than in fifth grade, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, interjections, phrases, and sentences.

INDEPENDENT READING In this course each student is required to do some reading on his own. He is assigned to read for thirty minutes each school night. Upon completion of a book the student is to write a book report. Grades are given both for the reading done and the book report.

VOCABULARY Students are given weekly vocabulary words from their reading story. They are to learn the words and their definitions. They are given weekly quizzes to make sure they are learning the material.

COMPOSITION The students write multi-paragraph compositions on the materials studied in History and Pacific Northwest History. Using this material, the students are taught to construct expository/narrative and argumentative paragraphs about places, people and events they study. They also work on raising their papers to a more mature level.

LATIN This year's Latin grammar follows along with the English grammar. So, whatever the student learns for the day in English, he will also learn its equivalent in Latin. There is also some translating of sentences into English.

ARITHMETIC THEORY In this course students continue to learn mathematical concepts. The concepts addressed in sixth grade include properties of addition and multiplication, number theory, geometry (classification of angles and triangles, similarity, congruence, three dimensional surfaces), word problems, proportions, and measurements (metric measures and conversions, perimeter, area, and volume).

ARITHMETIC COMPUTATION This course is a continued review and practice of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions and decimals.

SCIENCE This course begins with a review of the previous years and goes into discussion of an individual's being defined by a set of qualities. It then moves into a beginning course in Chemistry. The students learn the names of some chemicals, their symbols and valence numbers. They then are introduced to chemical equations and taught how to balance them. They also do experiments. Some are concerned with the making of defining lists. Others involve predicting the results of chemical reactions.

HISTORY In sixth grade, the students study Medieval Europe. The subject is covered from the viewpoint that the era represented the development, flourishing, and decline of a Catholic culture. The students examine the causes that produced that Catholic culture, then they look at its main characteristics, and finally examine the causes that led to its decline. They also look at the roots within that culture that made it ripe for the one that took its place.

PACIFIC NORTHWEST HISTORY This is a general survey of the Pacific Northwest. It begins with a study of the history of Oregon, Washington and Idaho from exploration, through statehood, and finally into the post World War II era. It also looks at the government and natural resources of the area.

ART AND MUSIC In this course the students learn about the art and music of the era they are studying in history. In this case, they learn about Medieval art and music. They also look at a little the art of the Pacific Northwest. This includes the viewing video tours of local museums.

GREGORIAN CHANT The students continue to practice and become proficient in sight-singing Gregorian Chant. If the student is new in the sixth grade, he will take the fifth grade Gregorian Chant course.

HEALTH In sixth grade the students learn about the various systems of the body. These are the respiratory, digestive, excretory, nervous, circulatory, and immune systems.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION We use the course in physical education to teach sportsmanship and genteel social behavior. We use the games played as opportunities to plant in the children a certain competitive drive while trying to balance it with good attitudes about winning and losing. We also teach the students the need to play fair and to follow the rules of the game. The games played also help develop the children's bodies and coordination.

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2530 South 298th Street
Federal Way, Washington
Phone: 253-839-0788
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